The topic of trauma-informed practice has never been more relevant. In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic and lockdown – and in its aftermath – we need to consider the role of childhood adversity and subsequent traumatising experiences in the lives of the people we are supporting.

Social and psychological problems have been increasing at alarming rates during the recent period of lockdown and restricted movement. We are seeing increased levels of mental health difficulties, children and adults reporting distress due to isolation and loneliness; domestic abuse and drug and alcohol problems – and this is likely to be the tip of the iceberg in the context of a sharp economic downturn.

By understanding the impact of trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), we are able to consider how the traumatic life events of the people we are supporting might be influencing their current behaviour or difficulties and how we can respond in a trauma-sensitive way – both as individual helping professionals, multi-agency workers and as organisations.

On 8 July I will be running a training seminar exploring these issues. It will be an introduction to the science of adverse childhood experiences, trauma-informed practice and resilience and is intended to be a solid foundation of essential knowledge and ideas on which organisations and individuals can build their own trauma informed response.

What we will cover:

  • The potential impact of adverse childhood experiences and other potentially traumatising life events.
  • How and why does adversity in childhood often have such long-lasting impacts?
  • Addressing some myths and controversies about the ACES movement.
  • What exactly is trauma-informed practice and where did it start?
  • Defining ‘resilience’ and exploring the research evidence and implications for practice.
  • Ideas about how this knowledge can assist you in your role, team, service & organisation.
  • Discussion about the psychological and social aftermath of the coronavirus pandemic and what response is required.

Anyone is welcome to join, but is specifically designed for people who support children or adults across:

  • Education
  • Health
  • Social care
  • Criminal justice
  • Third sector organisations

To book your place, please visit the Eventbrite page. I hope to see you there.

By understanding the impact of trauma and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), we are able to consider how the traumatic life events of the people we are supporting might be influencing their current behaviour or difficulties and how we can respond in a trauma-sensitive way.

Book now